I have many friends overseas who are ‘accidental Americans’. A Panamanian, for example, who by accident of birth ended up a US citizen because her father was born in the Panama Canal Zone.

She lives her entire life in Panama… studying, working, building a business. Then one day she receives a note from the IRS demanding money.

They inform her that, as a US citizen, she is required to pay taxes on her worldwide income to Uncle Sam even though she has barely set foot on US soil. Then they command her to settle up.

Even for folks born and raised in the US, tax compliance has become epically aggressive.

The US tax code is among the most complicated on the planet …

For example, Anton Ginzburg was fined $1.5 million by the US Department of Justice in 2011. And frankly he got off easy. He faced up to five years in prison.

What was Mr. Ginzburg’s heinous crime? What nefarious deeds had this criminal mastermind perpetrated against a peaceful society?

He didn’t file a disclosure form to report his Swiss bank account.

Note– Mr. Ginzburg wasn’t accused of tax evasion. He was fully compliant in paying his fair share to the US government. He simply didn’t file a form.

This isn’t how a free society should function.

If a government has to collect taxes by terrorizing its people or sniffing out accidental citizens, something is obviously wrong with the tax policy. AND they way they spend it.

After all, who in good conscience wants to go their entire working lives supporting a government that wastes tax dollars on bombs, drones, spying on citizens, and bankrupting unborn generations?

It’s no wonder why the number of Americans renouncing their citizenship is increasing exponentially… and will likely continue to do so.

Back when Elizabeth Taylor and T.S. Eliot did it, it was so rare there was really no process. And no fee.

In fact, renouncing US citizenship was free of charge until a couple of years ago. Then, overnight, the State Department imposed a $450 fee.

Yesterday they increased it once again– to $2,350. That’s a 422% increase.

In its explanation, the State Department whined that the costs of processing renunciations had simply become too high.

It’s curious that a government which denies inflation even exists would complain about the consequences of it.


Simon Black (via thinksquad)

(Source: the-altar, via thinksquad)

futurist-foresight:

An interesting innovation -  a ruler that measures angles.
trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

"Glassified" Ruler by MIT Media Lab Automatically Measures Angles, Volume, and Shape Properties.
[source]

futurist-foresight:

An interesting innovation -  a ruler that measures angles.

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

"Glassified" Ruler by MIT Media Lab Automatically Measures Angles, Volume, and Shape Properties.

[source]

(via thinksquad)

But women can never be careful enough, can we? If we take naked pictures of ourselves, we’re asking for it. If someone can manage to hack into our accounts, we’re asking for it. If we’re not wearing anti-rape nail polish, we’re asking for it. If we don’t take self-defence classes, we’re asking for it. If we get drunk, we’re asking for it. If our skirts are too short, we’re asking for it. If we pass out at a party, we’re asking for it. If we are not hyper-vigilant every single fucking second of every single fucking day, we are asking for it. Even when we are hyper-vigilant, we’re still asking for it. The fact that we exist is asking for it.

This is what rape culture looks like.

This is what misogyny looks like.


black-culture:

Stop demonizing riots.-@zellieimani

black-culture:

Stop demonizing riots.-@zellieimani

(via seriouslyamerica)

How To Talk To Babies About Marxist Theory


  • BABY: [builds tower with blocks]
  • ME: ok this is very good
  • under capitalism massive building projects are constructed through wage slavery
  • and through their sheer size and scale intimidate and pacify the masses
  • so this is a great comment
  • BABY: [knocks over tower]
  • ME: that’s right
“The thing about being an adult that no one tells you growing up is that you don’t feel like an adult. All your stupid insecurities and anxieties are still there, only you feel more stupid and insecure about being stupid and insecure because you’re not supposed be stupid and insecure anymore. You’re supposed to have the answers. You’re supposed to know. But we don’t always know. And those answers? They’re not always easy to come by. Well you know what? I’m done feeling stupid and insecure about feeling stupid and insecure. The truth is, I think part of being an adult is that you stop waiting for yourself to change and you start to accept who you are.”

EMILY OWENS, MD (via iamwalp)

macrolit:

Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck

(via booklover)

“This is how thoroughly we women have been sexualized, that we cannot make the kind of noises that come with physical exertion without it being associated with sex. In fact, everything about our bodies has been sexualized in one way or another. If we groan during sport or we breast-feed in public, we are criticized for making people think about sex. If we talk openly about things like menstruation and poop and farts, then we are criticized for making people not want to think about sex.

Think about what it means to be ladylike and all of the adjectives that go along with it: elegant, cultured, classy, sophisticated. To be successful at being feminine means being successful at being private, keeping your body’s natural functions behind closed doors and never letting anyone know they exist. It means to be constrained, that you do not let your legs spread wide in public transportation and you do not make noises that are harsh on the ears. It means presenting a polished, shiny surface to the world at all times, one that allows others to project whatever they wish onto you while never showing too much of your true self.”

“Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

Absolutely.

And does that suck?

Absolutely.

But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

And that’s not the same for fat folk.

When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

That’s thin privilege.”