sailoraphrodite:

gluttonyghost:

DO HE GOT THE BOOTY

From the reactions to the people in the background it looks like he has something else.

Horse: Oh god man

Granny: Take me now

Lady: I mustn’t look

Baby: I want to be like you when I grow up

Mother: Don’t look children

Guy: *ded*

sailoraphrodite:

gluttonyghost:

DO HE GOT THE BOOTY

From the reactions to the people in the background it looks like he has something else.

image

Horse: Oh god man

image

Granny: Take me now

image

Lady: I mustn’t look

image

Baby: I want to be like you when I grow up

image

Mother: Don’t look children

image

Guy: *ded*

(Source: martyr-eater, via porko-fattano)

Your fiancé’s right. The whole country loves your sister. If they torture her, or do anything to her, forget the districts - there will be riots in the Capitol.

(Source: gifthg, via girlonfxre)

Just how accurate are the memories that we know are true, that we believe in?

The brain abhors a vacuum. Under the best of observation conditions, the absolute best, we only detect, encode and store in our brains bits and pieces of the entire experience in front of us. When it’s important for us to recall what it was that we experienced, we have an incomplete [memory] store, and what happens?

Below awareness, without any kind of motivated processing, the brain fills in information that was not there, not originally stored, from inference, from speculation, from sources of information that came to you, as the observer, after the observation. But it happens without awareness such that you aren’t even cognizant of it occurring. It’s called ‘reconstructed memory.’

All our memories are reconstructed memories. They are the product of what we originally experienced and everything that’s happened afterwards. They’re dynamic. They’re malleable. They’re volatile. And as a result, we all need to remember that the accuracy of our memories is not measured in how vivid they are nor how certain you are that they’re correct.


Are your memories real .. or fake? Neurophysiologist Scott Fraser says you shouldn’t be so sure that what you remember is always what actually happened. Fraser researches how humans remember crimes, and in a powerful talk at TEDxUSC, he suggests that even close-up eyewitnesses to a crime can create “memories” they couldn’t have seen.

Watch the whole talk here» (via tedx)

(via thescienceofreality)

lindsaylohoean:

all the people around me are falling in love and im just here falling asleep

(via youreverydayninja)

orchidsinoctober:

Irene Kim

orchidsinoctober:

Irene Kim

fromquarkstoquasars:

Rare Genetic Mutation Makes Siblings Immune to Viruses:

And they may be the key to the ultimate cure. Learn about the possibilities at:http://goo.gl/j7MGpj

fromquarkstoquasars:

Rare Genetic Mutation Makes Siblings Immune to Viruses:

And they may be the key to the ultimate cure. Learn about the possibilities at:
http://goo.gl/j7MGpj

(via kenobi-wan-obi)